How to Half Double Crochet (Hdc)

Hi Noble Knitters! It's Suzanne with NobleKnits.com with another crochet technique. Today's technique is known as the half double crochet (abbreviation: hdc).

We are going to use the foundation chain that we've used before, and we are going to go into the third chain from the hook. So we're going to skip the first two chains and go into this third chain from the hook. We're going to yarn over before we going into that chain. Then we are going to yarn over as before and pull through the first loop on the hook. Now, instead of having two loops on the hook you'll have three. We're going to yarn over and and pull through all three loops on the hook. 

Yarn over, go into the stitch, a yarn over again and pull through one, yarn over another time and pull all three stitches off the hook. Again, yarn over, go into the stitch. Yarn over, pull through, yarn over, pull through three. Yarn over, go into the stitch, yarn over, pull through one, and yarn over and pull through all the stitches. Last one in the row - yarn over and go into the stitch. Yarn over pull through, yarn over pull through. 

Alright so a couple things that are different (than single crochet). Because a half double crochet is taller than a single crochet, when we get to the turning chain...we are at the end of this row and we want to go back the other way...so at the end here instead of doing just one chain (like in single crochet) we are going to do two. So here's one chain and then two chains. Ok, now we're going to turn our work over. Now these two chains count as our first half double crochet. Instead of going into this first stitch like we would with a single crochet, we are going to go into this second stitch right here.

So we look for the v and we look for the hole, now we're going to yarn over and go into that stitch right there. Then we are going to yarn over again and pull through the first stitch. Then yarn over again and pull through all three stitches on the hook. Next stitch: yarn over, look for that v and go into the stitch. Yarn over and pull through, yarn over pull through all three. Repeat that to the last stitch.

Now we are at the end and there's another difference I want to show you really quick. Because that turning chain made up our first stitch, we now have to work our last stitch into that turning chain. That confuses people sometimes because you'll start to lose stitches in your row if you don't work that last stitch. You'll go into the top chain of that turning chain and work the stitch the same way..yarn over go into the stitch, yarn over pull through one, yarn over pull through all three.

Ok, you have the half double crochet! Please comment, like this video, and subscribe to our YouTube channel. Thanks for watching!

How to Crochet: the Slip Stitch

Hi NobleKnitters! It's Suzanne with NobleKnits.com with another crochet technique for you. It's called the Slip Stitch.

The Slip Stitch is the smallest of the stitches that you are going to be making in crochet and probably the easiest next to the chain stitch. A chain stitch is used for moving across a row of stitches without adding any height. It's also used to join to ends or a row together. It's used for edging sometimes and some people use it to join different colors of yarn. 

To get started with the Slip Stitch, like I said, it's the smallest of all the stitches especially in height. So to begin, I did a foundation chain so we can work our stitches. So let's go into the second chain from the hook. Here is the first one and here is the second one. So we're just going to insert our hook in. We're not going to yarn over to start with, but we are going to yarn over now, just like all the other stitches. We're going to pull through the chain and instead of wrapping and pulling through, we're just going to pull through again. That's what makes it the smallest stitch. We're not wrapping over before we insert the hook, and we're not wrapping over after we pull the stitch through. 

Once again, I'll show you. You go in, yarn over, then pull through, and pull through again. Let's do it again. You go into your stitch, yarn over, pull through, and pull through again. No wrapping over. 

Go into your stitch, yarn over, pull through, and pull through again. There's no wrapping over before you go into the stitch. Go into the stitch, yarn over pull through, and pull through again. When you stop and look at it, it doesn't actually look like a single crochet. It's so you can move along the stitches in your row. It does, however, leave you with the v's up at the top like we get from the other stitches. 

Ok, so I'm going to work to the end so I can demonstrate how we do our turning chain if we are moving from one row to the next. I just want to show you that really quick. So one more slip stitch here. So we go into the stitch, yarn over, pull through one, pull through two. So now we need to increase so we have some height so we can turn. So we'll do a chain one. And then this is like a single crochet, we go into the first stitch here. Go under the v's and yarn over. Pull through and pull through. Oops, it got a little loose when I pulled through. Ok, so we go into the stitch under those v's. Since it's so much shorter, it's a little bit tighter and a little bit harder to get into. Pull through and pull through again.

I want to show you just real quick, too, how you would do this if you wanted to join a circle, rather, join a row to make a circle. So we have a row of chain stitches here, a foundation chain. In order to use your slip stitch to join two ends, all you do is look for your first chain. This would be your last chain and this would be your first chain. So you go into that first chain, yarn over, pull through, and pull through. That's how you can join the yarn rows together to make a circle. 

Once again this is the slip stitch and I'm Suzanne with NobleKnits.com. Please subscribe to our YouTube channel, like and comment below. Thanks for watching! 

How to Crochet: Finishing Off

Hi NobleKnitters! It's Suzanne with NobleKnits.com here with another crochet technique. Today's technique is going to be how to fasten off or finish off a crochet project. So right now we have the project where we've been doing nine single crochet. I'm going to finish that off by crocheting that last couple stitches here in this row. 

Alright, so this is the last single crochet that we have in this row of nine. In order to fasten off, all we need to do is leave about a four inch tail on your crochet project. I'm actually going to just cut the yarn now.  

One thing I want to remind you about is that when you cut this yarn to end it and when you begin your project with the tail, you want to leave a pretty good bit...so about four or five inches. Because in the next video, I'll show you how to finish this yarn off even more. We are going to weave this yarn into the project so that it will seemingly disappear into the project and you won't even see it. But, if you leave yourself not enough of a tail and you just cut off, say, this short amount, there's just not enough to weave in. Then you'll have little pieces of yarn sticking out, it won't look as pretty and it could unravel.

Ok, so we are on our last stitch and we've cut our yarn off to about four inches. So all we do is yarn over, and pull through. Then tighten this up a little bit and that actually makes your knot. Your project is finished off! That's all there is to complete it.  Next time, I'll show you how to weave the ends in.

This has been fastening off or finishing off your crochet project. I'm Suzanne with NobleKnits. Like, comment, and subscribe to our YouTube channel. Thanks for watching!

How to Crochet: Weaving in Yarn Ends

What to do with all of the yarn tails once you've finished crocheting? This short video will show you how to weave in yarn ends so that you can't see them and they won't come undone. 

Yarn used in this video is Ewe Ewe Wooly Worsted Yarn, shown in Sky Blue. It's a great everyday yarn for knitting or crocheting!

Finishing needles used - Clover Chibi Gold: http://www.nobleknits.com/clover-chib...

Scissors used - Hiya Hiya Puppy Snips: http://www.nobleknits.com/hiya-hiya-p...

Join the crochet community and subscribe to our YouTube channel: http://www.youtube.com/nobleknits

How to Start a Crochet Chain

I'm going to show you a crochet technique for how to do a chain stitch. It's the foundation for any kind of crochet project. How you start a crochet chain is with a slip knot. To do a slip knot, you just fold one end of yarn over the piece of yarn to make a little loop. Then you bring your crochet hook through and tighten gently. It makes a little knot on there. 

One of the most important things about this stitch, the chain stitch, and your slip knot for that matter - is that you keep it nice and loose. You don't want to be too tight. So, to begin your chain, you'll just loop the yarn over the hook and pull through the loop on the hook. That is one single chain that you have just made. 

Now bring your yarn over the hook and pull through the loop on the hook. Now you have made two chains. Bring the yarn over the hook and pull it through - 3 chains.

You just keep doing this...now 4, 5 chains made. Now 6...see it makes a row of stitches that are the foundation for the rest of your project. 

Another important thing to remember as you are working these stitches, is to keep your fingers moving up the chain. It makes it easier to control the chain.

So that's your technique for today; a chain stitch. Thanks for watching! Like us, comment, and subscribe to our YouTube Channel