Raglan Shaping: How-to Identify What Round You Are On

Why I love top-down raglan sweater knitting projects

They're easy and work up quickly in the round or back and forth. I especially like the ones in the round because they're usually just knit- knit- knit  (i.e. a relaxing kickback, no-think project). But because they are so easy, sometimes I'm so into the process that

I actually forget what row

I'm on. Has this ever happened to you?

In this quick tutorial, I'll show you how to identify what round you are on just by looking at the stitches!

Typically on top down projects there is an increase round (usually formed with yarn overs), followed by a knit round. That's how you create your gentle outward increase.

How to Identify What Round You Are One

Each raglan line has an increase on either side of a central stitch(es)*. Usually, that point is going to have a marker placed right in front (or on either side) of it so you know where to place the increase.

*Raglan projects may have 1 or more central stitches depending on the design.

How to Identify the Knit Stitch Round

Here's the stitch before my stitch marker. It's sort of a circle shape and has a horizontal bottom (that's where I drew my loop thru and made my knit stitch on the previous row).  

That how I can see that on the last round I knit that stitch, so this round is my yarnover round.

My thumb is pointing at the bottom of the stitch

My thumb is pointing at the bottom of the stitch

Stretched, the stitch looks almost like an "A", that means it was a knit stitch on the last round.

Stretched, the stitch looks almost like an "A", that means it was a knit stitch on the last round.

How to Identify an Increase (Yarn Over) Round

I've made it all the way around and completed all of my yarn overs of the row. Now I'm getting read to work the next round.

I've knit my 1st stitch after my starting marker and here's what the next one looks like. If you look at the images below you'll see it's literally a yarn over or a loop over the needle. In the 2nd image I've actually rotated my needle a little forward so you can see what it looks like from the back.

See the yarn over on my needle?

See the yarn over on my needle?

My yarn over from a different angle.

My yarn over from a different angle.

Here's what it looks like when I insert the right needle

Here's what it looks like when I insert the right needle

Yup!  That is a big eyelet hole, so that's the yarnover on the last row. Now I know to knit the stitch and knit the entire round.

That's all there is to keeping raglan shaping right on-track! Keep following the tips above and in no time you'll have a perfect raglan line!

Your raglan shaping should look like this

Your raglan shaping should look like this

Happy knitting and may the perfect project always be on your sticks!

- KnitDocDonna